Beyond Icarus to Mars: The Future of Travel

This article is part of a series of articles on design thinking and thought leaders that transform into what we at CLC Advisors call “i.e.,” the “idea economy.” Where ideas become and transform into widgets for those who choose to dare mighty things and build something.

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Remember the days when people bought a plane ticket through a travel agent and a paper ticket was issued. When airlines, crew, and staff took pains in order to ensure those lucky enough to afford a plane ticket would travel in luxury and comfort? It was something of a lifestyle coveted by all, yet experienced by few. With the explosion of the internet, aviation research and technology, fuel costs, travel is not only online today, but the customer’s journey from discovery to return to base has shifted and changed dramatically. We are again at those crossroads, the travel and transportation industries are hustling to meet those demands.

With the expectation and estimates of the space industry estimated to grow by 2040 to US$1.1 trillion and US$2.7 trillion by Morgan Stanley and Bank of America Merrill Lynch respectively, the landscape of the future of travel will exponentially shift again. SpaceX’s Elon Musk’s bold call for BFR, a reusable transport rocket that can transport travelers to anywhere on the globe in under an hour, seems like a moonshot in the distant future, but a necessary first step if the human race is to become multi-planetary. The race was started by Richard Branson and Virgin Galactic years ago in the quest to travel up to the tip of the atmosphere to bounce back into airspace, shortening the travel time between two points of destination. Jeff Bezos and Blue Origin, impressively funded by Bezos himself, is another major player in the commercial aerospace industry joining titans such as Lockheed Martin, Sierra Nevada, Airbus, ULA, Rolls Royce, and Boeing on the propulsion engine and systems side.

Shaping the way people discover, shop, and share their travel journeys has redefined the mobility industry and how the world connects with personal and business travel. Not just people, but the transfer of material and consumer goods as well. To better understand how the future of travel continues to inspire the world of people and mobility, CLC Advisors and our experts are looking into the following areas and new industry players, identifying key shifts and trends that are influencing creatively our appetites and passion for the future travel:

  • Trade, delivery & transport of goods (manned and unmanned)
  • Energy, efficiency, & fuel
  • Propulsion and landing systems
  • Infrastructure development in cities and future colonies
  • Sustainability and carbon-free environmental technologies
  • Recycled rockets
  • Consumer electronics, AR, & VR
  • New materials and material science
  • Batteries, sensors, & ioT
  • Artificial intelligence and robotics
  • Health, medicine, & wellness
  • Food & hospitality
  • Future supply chains & 3-d printing
  • Optical communications, satellite positioning (low-earth and above-earth), lasers, radar and telemetry (See our recent article about space lasers and satellite communications at our site visit to NASA Goddard here or on Medium here.)
  • Data and public safety
  • Behavioral science and psychology
  • Global economic impact
  • To learn more about the future of travel and the future impact of frontier technologies and investment in the public and private commercial aerospace and aviation industry, and the behaviors science when it comes to travel, head over to our i.e. section of our website here. We are looking for industry executives and companies who are interested in our industry research report and we will be sharing some success stories on our website and our page on Medium here. Please feel free to contact us here or via email at info@clcadvisors.com.

    About Cindy Chin
    Ms. Chin is an entrepreneur, venture strategist, & cultural ambassador of the arts & sciences. As CEO of CLC Advisors, LLC, she is an advisor & board member to founding startup teams, opportunity scout for VC & LP partners, a global strategic thought leader, & a sought-after speaker.

    Cindy is also a NASA Datanaut, an open data innovation program to promote data science, coding, and gender diversity. The NASA Datanauts program operates within the Office of the CIO at NASA Headquarters. She is also a mentor in the Google Launchpad Mentor Program, Stanford University’s Technology Entrepreneurship and undergrad programs, and a member of the faculty of the Startup Executive Academy of Silicon Castles in Salzburg, Austria.

    Cindy is passionate about social impact, smART cities, public-private sector partnerships & building great companies. She achieves this by defining strategies for building multidisciplinary ecosystems, accelerators, outreach, & innovation phases of ventures, alternative revenue generation & sustainability. Gender parity & diversity are factors for consideration.

    About CLC Advisors, LLC
    CLC Advisors, LLC is a firm of trusted advisors and management consultants focusing on development and execution strategies to build and incubate value-based business ventures, innovations, initiatives, and forward exponential technologies to future societies and smART cities. We are dedicated to finding solutions for traditional business models or expanding into the growing arenas of impact investing, corporate social responsibility, sustainability, and philanthropy venture capital.

 

Pew! Pew! Laser tag with Space Lasers

This article is part of a series of articles on design thinking and thought leaders that transform into what we at CLC Advisors, LLC call “i.e.,” the “idea economy.” Where ideas become and transform into widgets for those who choose to dare mighty things and build something.

By Cindy Chin, CEO CLC Advisors, LLC

Copyright © Cindy Chin. All rights reserved.

Last week, I had a site visit to NASA Goddard to tour the facility again where the laser instrument on NASA’s ICESat-2 satellite — called ATLAS, for Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System — is undergoing testing before its 2018 launch.

NASA Goddard. Copyright © Cindy Chin. All rights reserved.

The ATLAS lidar on ICESat-2 uses 6 laser beams to measure the earth’s elevation and elevation change. By arranging the beams in three pairs of two, scientists can also determine the slope between the two beams, a key component of determining elevation change along the Reference Ground Track.

Data measurements and project scientist presentation was displayed on NASA Goddard’s stunning hyperwall where the implications of one (1) meter of sea level rise will have huge economic implications on cities around the globe. The data shows that the ice in Greenland and the Nordics is already shrinking on the effects of #climatechange.

In addition to speaking to the project scientists of ICESat2, during the visit I got to see the Global Ecosystem and Dynamics Investigation instrument as it is being built. Pronounced “Jedi,” GEDI launches in 2019 to the International Space Station and will be used to obtain NASA’s first high-resolution laser ranging observations of the 3D structure of Earth. The casing for GEDI is almost complete and will be launched into space on a #SpaceX’s payload to the ISS, International Space Station. NASA uses VR and Oculus Rift for laser communications demonstration of the TDRS.

On an unplanned visit, my second, to NASA Hubble’s Control Center with Hubble Deputy Project Manager Jim F. Jeletic, we learned that guidance sensors on are used to control the Hubble Telescope. Mission Control Center functions autonomously today and Hubble’s team is excited for the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope in 2019 from Kourou, French Guiana. With the #data collected from both telescopes, Hubble at visible light, near infrared (IR), and ultraviolet light, and James Webb at unprecedented resolution and sensitivity from the long-wavelength (orange to red) visible light through the mid-infrared (0.6 to 27 micrometer) range, the data will give a more complete picture of our universe, stars, and other galaxies, complementing Hubble’s data.

It also was exciting to see the mock-up of WFIRST, Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, that will be used to explore dark matter and exoplanets and the preparation of TIRS, Thermal Infrared Sensor that be launched with Landsat-8.

Copyright © Cindy Chin. All rights reserved.

The visit concluded with a laser demonstration of TDRS, Tracking and Data Relay Satellites, at the NASA Goddard Geophysical abd Astronomical Observatory (GGAO) and it’s command centers where a laser beam is shot into the sky every few minutes and captured by a passing satellite. The precision of space lasers used in optical communications is looking for a target no larger than a dime, an incredible feat, and the research and development is setting the path for future optical communications for satellites that is beyond GPS here on low-Earth orbit.

Thank you to #NASASocial and NASA Goddard for letting me tag along on the site visit. It was a long and really inspiring day! #pewpew #spacelasers

Image: NASA Social

To learn more about what is happening at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, please see below:

NASA ICESat2 Mission: https://icesat-2.gsfc.nasa.gov

NASA Space Lasers: https://icesat-2.gsfc.nasa.gov/space_lasers

NASA GEDI (Global Ecosystem and Dynamics Investigation): https://science.nasa.gov/missions/gedi

NASA Hubble Mission: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html

NASA TDRS, Tracking and Data Relay Satellites: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/tdrs/home/index.html

NASA GGAO, Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory: https://cddis.nasa.gov/ggao/

About NASA Goddard

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is home to the nation’s largest organization of scientists, engineers and technologists who build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study Earth, the sun, our solar system and the universe.

Just outside Washington, Goddard is home to Hubble operations and the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Goddard manages communications between mission control and orbiting astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Goddard scientists stare into the sun, grind up meteorites for signs of life’s building blocks, look into the farthest reaches of space, and untangle the mysteries of our own changing world. Goddard engineers construct sensitive instruments, build telescopes that peer into the cosmos, and operate the test chambers that ensure those satellites’ survival.

Named for American rocketry pioneer Dr. Robert H. Goddard, the center was established May 1, 1959, as NASA’s first space flight complex. Goddard and its several installations are critical in carrying out NASA’s missions of space exploration and scientific discovery.

For more information, please visit the NASA Goddard website at https://www.nasa.gov/goddard

Beyond Moonshots: Mars 🚀

img_8168-1      By Cindy Chin, CEO, CLC Advisors, LLC

This article is the first of a series of articles on design thinking and what we at CLC Advisors, LLC call “i.e.,” the “idea economy.”

This week alone, I traveled from one continent to another and down the eastern coast and back home again. All this air travel was made possible by the investment, research, and development in science and technology, some of which came from space research from NASA and the military. Some of that investment birthed technologies like satellites and GPS for air transport guidance, internet connectivity and the wide array of mobile apps on my smartphone to get me to my destinations, reminders, plane ticket bookings, wingtip technologies on the Boeing and Airbus planes, wind and jet stream resiliency for airplane stability, weather guidance for a smoother ride home, medical research on passenger comfort, and research on gravity to land safely on the ground to name a few on what tax payer dollars and investments in science, technology, and space years ago has provided for our technologies today.

This week culminated in some spending two days with IBM’s OS Earth group, a new think tank bringing together a group of designers, scientists, and coders, the more fashionable of names now for one who was a programmer mere decades ago. I was reminded again yesterday during our sessions of why we are often drawn to the impossible and tasked with finding those answers and solutions to burning questions. It is great leadership that can allow impossible to become possible and no matter who is sitting in an office in a city, territory, or country near you, that progress cannot be stifled.

“Newton explored the meaning of gravity. Last month electric lights and telephones and automobiles and airplanes became available. Only last week did we develop penicillin and television and nuclear power, and now if America’s spacecraft succeeds in reaching Venus, we will have literally reached the stars before midnight tonight.

This is a breathtaking pace, and such a pace cannot help but create new ills as it dispels old, new ignorance, new problems, new dangers. Surely the opening vistas of space promise high costs and hardships, as well as high reward.

So it is not surprising that some would have us stay where we are a little longer to rest, to wait. But this city of Houston, this state of Texas, this country of the United States was not built by those who waited and rested and wished to look behind them. This country was conquered by those who moved forward — and so will space.”
– President John F. Kennedy, Jr.

As I watched a program hosted by Morgan Freeman on wormhole theories, I was also reminded that time does not always move linearly. Einstein in his theory of relativity proved that time sometimes folds and we see patterns of repetitiveness. This is one of those times, but no matter what, it is always fluid. So, take this time to move to the past for a little over 17 minutes to one of the greatest and inspirational leaders with whom we had too short of time with, but in that short time inspired a generation and the ripple effects of an incredible era of invention, innovation, new industries, humanity, and wealth creation. Believe me, it is worth those 17 minutes of time to hear those presidential words again.

The broad advancements in science in the areas of climate change, earth science, research and development, mathematics, and technology are still necessary and to echo White House Chief Technology Officer Megan Smith, “not a charity case, but a prosperity case.” It is all hands on deck and imperative for the survival of many species on this Spaceship Earth.

If you are an entrepreneur or startups who are working on climate change, aerospace, data science your own Mars Shot, or market entry into the United States, our team at CLC Advisors, LLC can help you. Contact us to find out more information or go to our website www.clcadvisors.com.

About CLC Advisors, LLC
CLC Advisors, LLC is a firm of trusted advisors and management consultants focusing on development and execution strategies to build and incubate value-based business ventures, innovations, initiatives, and forward technologies. We are dedicated to finding solutions for traditional business models or expanding into the growing arenas of impact investing, corporate social responsibility, sustainability, and philanthropy venture capital.

#inspiration #moonshots #science #datascience #climatechange #space #aerospace #Sundaywisdom #entrepreneur #startups