About CLC Advisors, LLC

CLC Advisors, LLC is a firm and network of trusted advisors and experts focusing on development and execution strategies to build and incubate values-based business ventures, innovations, initiatives, and forward exponential technologies to future societies and smART cities. We are dedicated to finding solutions for traditional business models or expanding into the growing arenas of artificial intelligence, blockchain, impact investing, corporate social responsibility, sustainability, venture capital, & philanthropy. We work with global businesses, government institutions and organizations in the private, public, and social sectors. We provide advisory services, leadership, and management expertise for private and public companies in addition to NGOs, think tanks and philanthropic institutions. With our network partners we connect companies and entrepreneurs with investment funds, PE firms, hedge funds & venture capitalists who are looking for impact opportunities and alternative investments. Global leaders who have a deep understanding & compassion for social responsibility, purpose-driven business, and the triple bottom line: social, environmental and economic returns for broader growth. We believe that leadership is crucial to the direction of companies and invest time in assisting with strengthening teams for strategic expansion, as an incubator for growing companies, creative business sectors, new ideas or concepts. In the growing field of philanthropy, venture capital, blockchain, and frontier technologies, we step into new and unchartered territory by bridging the gap between tech, the humanities, and the finance worlds. Execution is key to dare mighty things. Speaking engagements: https://clcadvisors.com/team/speaker-topics/ To connect: https://bit.ly/2LTelvl

U.S.-China High-Level Consultation on People-to-People Exchange, CPE2016

CLC Advisors, LLC is honored to be invited to the U.S.-China High-Level Consultation on People-to-People Exchange, CPE2016 in Beijing, China this month running concurrently with the U.S.-China Strategic & Economic Dialogue led by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and U.S. Undersecretary of State Richard Stengel. CEO Cindy Chin joined members of the Secretary’s Office of Women’s Global Issues (S/GWI) as a delegate of the U.S. Women’s Pillar, presented on women’s entrepreneurship, and a speaker and mentor at the U.S.-China Women’s Leadership Exchange and Dialogue (WE-LEAD) in partnership with Goldman Sachs’ 10,000 Women Initiative.

img_5351-1

During the Working Session with the All-China Women’s Federation 中华全国妇女联合会she reported on the state of women’s entrepreneurship in the United States and potential impact and the importance of collaborations between the U.S. and China in the private and public sectors:

“The presence of American companies in China will play an important role in empowering women and girls in both entrepreneurship and anti-domestic violence issues in both countries.  Strategically looking for global ecosystems that can support high-impact work by fine tuning strategies across several cross-functional industries and sectors to solidify foundations and stakeholders in a company’s growth as well as GDP.

Venture funds now look for women entrepreneurs and diversity. After studies from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and McKinsey Global Institute report, we know that advancing gender equality and the advancement of women can increase the annual global GDP by $12 trillion, or 11% by 2025. The public, private, and social sectors need to act together to close the gender gaps. In a full potential scenario where women play an identical role in labor markets to that of men, as much as $28 trillion or 26 percent could be added to global annual GDP by 2025. In China alone, the figure is even greater at 12% increase by 2025 or $2.5 trillion than any other country. Startups with at least one woman co-founder outperform all-male teams. In some VCs, that could mean as much as 62% in better performance and investor returns.

We need to support multi-lateral and multi-national organizations that require private-public sector partnerships, strength regional norms and intellectual property rights, cooperation on human rights, domestic violence, and gender equality.

img_1887

The potential for innovation in China is tremendous. Global entrepreneurs who are starting businesses must have a China strategy if they want to obtain scaleable global growth. Currently, China’s long-term market potential is ripely positioned to have greater impact in global GDP growth than other parts of the world and can learn from the mistakes of the West an innovate with great scale. Such examples include the realm of Fintech and mobile payments, agricultural business innovations, and the potential to leapfrog growth in these areas.

As global business and industry leaders are advocating the support of women, I want to emphasize the importance that as women, we have a wonderful opportunity for continued collaboration, dialogue, and communications that can have higher impact for female entrepreneurs beyond the support of mentorship of businesses and the borders of both countries.” – Cindy Chin, CEO CLC Advisors, LLC

img_1888

Full Moon Rise at Stonehenge

By Cindy Chin, CEO & Founder, CLC Advisors, LLC

On Sunday, 27 September, 2015, twenty-eight amateur and professional astronomers and photographers ranging from ages 5 to 65 descended upon the English countryside in Salisbury, UK, to the Stonehenge monument in Amesbury. The reason for this occasion that has been occurring for the past twelve years was to view the full moon rise amongst the stones.

Autumn Supermoon rise at Stonehenge. Salisbury, UK.

Since 2002, Pete Glastonbury has been organizing this special access event to view the full moon risings for the last 12 years. The first was a special commission for Stonehenge that included renowned archaeoastronomers Professor Gerald Hawkins, Professor Vance Tiede and Professor Hubert Allen. Fast-forward a dozen years and we have English Heritage’s steward Simon Banton as unofficial guide and new generations of astronomers.

Pete Glastonbury

This year wasn’t any regular autumn full moon rise, but a “super moon” coinciding with a blood full moon in combination with a total lunar eclipse later in the evening. This phenomenon has not occurred in more than 30 years, the last occurring in 1982, and the next one expected in 2033. The perigee full moon, when the moon is closest to the earth (approximately 31,000 miles closer), was fully visible rising from the stone circle of Stonehenge and our group of astronomers were ready with their cameras and tripods to capture the moment as the sun was seen setting directly behind them.

Sunset at Stonehenge Circle, 27 September, 2015

Lunar eclipses typically occur about twice a year when the Earth’s shadow blankets the moon from the sun. Modern-day scientists and astronomers can predict eclipses many centuries into the future and the stones at Stonehenge were constructed in a fashion that in ancient times communities were using their own methods to predict such occurrences. This fourth and final eclipse of a lunar tetrad was also called the “blood moon” as the moon appears in a reddish-orange brown during full lunar eclipse.

Supermoon rise at Stonehenge Circle

According to Simon Banton, a steward of English Heritage who led this group into the inner circle of the stones, the builders of Stonehenge were astonishing engineers. “Someone conceived the design of the structure as an architect. There are many hundreds of stone circles in Britain alone. Stonehenge was built with stones designed to fit into other stones. Two uprights and one across the top of the stones.”

Bluestones, polished & unfinished

English Heritage’s Steward Simon Banton holding a Bronze Age axe head. Stonehenge, Salisbury, United Kingdom.

The winter solstice sunset signifies the end of one cycle and the beginning of another cycle. The only unarguable alignment of Stonehenge in the way it was built in the direction facing the winter solstice with a progression in height: Two small, two medium, and one large, increasing in height. Entering the temple is most impressive is what’s facing, framing, or from the heel stone.

British-born American archaeoastronomer Gerald Hawkins first proposed that Stonehenge was an an ancient astronomical observatory that was used to predict the movements of the stars and sun. Using an early-model IBM 7090 computer, Hawkins entered the positions of the standing stones and other features of Stonehenge to model the movements and positions of the sun and moon using the positions of 56 holes as markers for the moon and sun to calculate the nodes of lunar orbit twice a day in a 28-day cycle.

One of the 56 Aubrey holes at Stonehenge.

With modern-day technology in archaeoastronomy, science is able to replicate and predict the accuracy of the stones at Stonehenge to measure the lunar orbits and seasons and their relevance even today. As space science outreach and retired teacher Chris Starr, 62, from Somerset said, “The experience of watching the moonrise was once in a lifetime, the sharing of a common experience from today, and what the ancients witnessed. Sharing a sense of wonder and a common thread. Stonehenge is an observatory built by some really smart ancestors. Even emerging from the plains of East Africa. It must have been quite a spectacle for our ancestors.”

Somerset’s Chris Starr at Stonehenge examining Bluestones.

Todd Howard, 40, another Stonehenge participant who was introduced to these outings through SpaceFest channels, pondered on the construction of Stonehenge. “It was built by intelligent people with astronomical awareness. Too many things that don’t line up to be a full observatory, but it had a huge social element to it,” as people traveled as far as Scotland to feast and celebrate the beginning of the new year.

Todd Howard

The furthest participant to travel was astrophotographer Jeanette Lamb, 52, who came all the way from Queensland, Australia, for the first time. She has entered local astronomy competitions and has been awarded prizes for her photographs of the night sky and stars. “I cried when the moon rose over the stones. The history and privilege of being allowed at Stonehenge to view the moon rise is amazing. When you live in a country where there is no astronomical society, online communities bring astronomers and space scientists together. The online community is making our world smaller.” Indeed it is.

Astrophotographer Jeanette Lamb. Photo credit: Amjad Zaidi.

For more on the documentary Pete Glastonbury and Silent Earth are currently filming, including the work of Professor Gerald Hawkins here.

This full article can also be found on Silent Earth’s website here.

Apple Season

By Cindy Chin, CEO & Founder, CLC Advisors, LLC

I have a dream.

An incredible three weeks away and I’m happy to be back to hug my little girl whom I missed dearly each day. I often get asked how can I be away for so long from family and the answer is sometimes absence does make the heart grow fonder, but in reality, the heart and the mind does not stop growing once you become an adult. In fact, it is the beginning as you are aware of a desire to want to create impact, solve problems, and which relationships are the most important to you, starting with the relationship with yourself. I’ve always said, a happier child is often a result of happy parents who have been able to pursue their goals and dreams and share along that journey. Sometimes it also means spending a little time apart and we have both grown from those experiences and eagerly share with each other what we’ve done apart. It makes us even closer.

Reconnect
What I’ve also learned on this trip is to relax and reconnect with the ability to not take oneself so seriously and laugh. (Those are some priceless selfies in Amsterdam on an escalator in Bijenkorf.) Take the moments to step away from “the office” and routine and connect with the creative side, foster mindfulness, and meet others who are of different places and backgrounds.

Johannes Vermeer’s “The Milkmaid” at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

I returned from the inaugural Sonophilia Summer Retreat in Salzburg, Austria which brought together business leaders, creative artists, entrepreneurs, and people at the best of their abilities to come together, share and discuss ideas, participate in mindfulness, and most importantly, to listen in the age of technology. Being present was mandatory. Here’s a look at why:

Welcome dinner for Sonophilia Summer Retreat at M32 in Salzburg, Austria.

In addition to spending time with three startup teams that I advise in Amsterdam, Düsseldorf, and Zürich, I also had the opportunity to visit Huawei Technologies in Düsseldorf, Germany to meet with two divisional heads to discuss social impact, corporate social responsibility, mobile connectivity, and the future of work.

Huawei Technologies office in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Build Relationships
Relationships are key. Dreamers and idealists need to be together. They see the magic and some are alchemists in being able to turn experiences into real and translatable opportunities. The investment of time in a relationship will often yield greater returns than the time originally allotted for a relationship. It may not always be the case so in less positive circumstances you must let them go to find more suitable returns elsewhere for both parties. It is the law of nature and selection that governs us beyond our intellectual comprehension.

With the Sharood App team in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Collaborate Together
There is an African proverb that hangs prominently on the walls of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in Seattle. It reads,

“If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.”

I had a chance for a private visit to renowned German artist Thomas Schönauer’s atelier in Düsseldorf. His work is wonderful, combining art, science, and innovative engineering with custom paints designed specifically for him by Henkel, a manufacturer of adhesives and paints for the commercial aviation industry. We spent several hours on a Saturday afternoon discussing his art, the intersections of art and science, both fundamental cornerstones in each of our respective professional paths, and collaborating in future ideas that would work and how to execute upon those ideas. Here are some of his dynamic collaborations at Sonophilia and in his atelier with Swarovski.

Engineering artist Thomas Schönauer at Sonophilia Summer Retreat in St. Jakob am Thurn, Austria.

At engineering artist Thomas Schönauer’s atelier in Düsseldorf, Germany.

Start Now
Don’t wait to start your goals. Did you know that in some countries in the world have mandatory retire,net age restrictions placed on them at the ages of 65 or 67. Think about it. That means if you’re 33, you are already at the middle age of your career. If you’re 43, you are at 2/3 of your professional career with only 1/3 of it left. In America, social security is in its last breaths and heart beats with no defibrillator in sight.

Sometimes it’s timing. Caught Maserati Germany on their summer tour.

Learn New Skills
The tsunami of a loss of jobs and skilled workforce is coming as that mandatory retirement age approaches for the masses to be replaced by workers who on average spend 1.4 years in a job position. For me, I’m just getting started with my company that focuses on social impact projects and solving tough problems including the creation of jobs in an idea economy rather than a knowledge or shared economy, the latter to which is impeding detrimentally the long-term value of skilled labor and wages. All this means that developing multiple streams of income is how one can succeed in the new era of the idea economy where machines that will soon surpass human capital. Having a multitude of interests and abilities is a necessary foundation in order to even be in the game now as a result of the knowledge economy.

Before there was Google Maps. Sitting down with a local and a paper map.



Apples, Not Lemons
You can build a company by using social media. I was a stay-at-home mom at one point. One day I decided to join a taskforce for a philanthropic institution that I loved. I missed work in teams, saw a huge problem and a need, and decided to start a company. I built a company on the Internet and social media. I am constantly seeking ideas and talent. Even more, the people who create a plan and do something about their ideas and not just imitate or replicate what is already existing. This is a work in progress and I hope it always will remain so.

What’s Next
So what’s next? The first day of school for my daughter, participation in the launch of the #MetKids website by the Metropolitan Museum of Art – one of many terrific institutions, a visit with Vermeer, another sojourn across the pond for something exciting on the full harvest moon, toasting the autumn harvest season, and most importantly two key events: 1) I have been invited to participate with 99 other global business leaders, Fortune-500 CEOs, former heads of state, governors, and university chancellors to discuss the innovation pathways on education, employment, training, and workforce challenges, and 2) return to Washington DC for the Committee for Economic Development Fall Policy Conference to engage with Washington legislators on the issues of entrepreneurship, startups, SME’s (small, medium entreprises) and the consistent practice of public-private sector partnerships especially when it comes to investment capital for new business ventures.

If we at CLC Advisors, LLC can help you or someone you know advance your goals or build your dreams, please contact us at info@clcadvisors.com. I am looking forward to sharing more exciting announcements soon in the very near future.